Category: information security

How To Protect Yourself From Frauds

Cyber world is a dangerous place. Governments, and private industries become more and more aware of this danger in every single day. What about the citizen Joe and citizen Anna? Are they aware of the cyber threats? Do they know  how cyber threats can take all of their hard earned money they put into banking accounts? Or somebody  who is thousands of miles away from them can impersonate them and make their friends to send money to that person? There are great variety of frauds in cyber world. Most of them are around for more than ten years. Most of them use similar techniques with old traditional fraudsters use in the physical world.

There are number of sites that has very good information about prevention of frauds. One of them is this site. Just watch the videos on the site and you will get idea of how those frauds can waste people time and make their life miserable. Just watch the video below. We will cover frauds in detail later.

 

There Is No Such Things As Security

Well, time to be honest with ourselves dear security community. Even if we have firewalls, IDSs, IPSs, antiviruses, SIEMs etc our systems are not secure and will not be secure since there is no such thing as security.

I know some of you are now became angry and thinking cross arguments but seriously think about it. Your work place for example. You have all kinds of good stuff to protect it, motion detectors, glass-break detectors, wired windows, doors etc… But what if a crime organization just break one of the door with a truck at night and now they are inside, can you still think you are secure? There is a level of insecurity. You can decrease that with what you have however when you think about your system you need to think they are insecure for some level.

One of the thing I recently (!) realized is there is balance in the life and most of the time we forget about it. Yes, nothing is secure about this doesn’t mean we need to freak out. This is what risk management for.

If you have two systems and one doesn’t have sensitive data and you have other systems that have data such that if you lose them you will go out of business then take care of the second systems. Don’t get so obsess about the first team so that you forget the important one. You need to protect what you need. I know it sounds sad that you will not pay enough attention for the first system for some cases, but that’s ok.

Security is very hot subject and lots of individuals are coming this area. Most of them are bright, smart people. They want to do their best but we need to give them right expectations of security. We need to secure every single asset as much as we can, as harder as we can. However we should classify those assets and focus on the more important ones. We also should not forget that there is no such things as security…

 

PCI Vulnerability Scans – Part II: PCI and Wireless

In my  previous PCI blog post we discussed risk level of vulnerabilities for PCI. In this blog post I will go over wireless requirements and how to detect rogue APs.

11.1 Test for the presence of wireless access points and detect unauthorized wireless access points on a quarterly basis.
Note: Methods that may be used in the process include but are not limited to wireless network scans, physical/logical inspections of system components and infrastructure, network access control (NAC), or wireless IDS/IPS. Whichever methods are used, they must be sufficient to detect and identify any unauthorized devices.

11.1.a Verify that the entity has a documented process to detect and identify wireless access points on a quarterly basis.

11.1.b Verify that the methodology is adequate to detect and identify any unauthorized wireless access points, including at least the following:

_ WLAN cards inserted into system components

_ Portable wireless devices connected to system components

(e.g., by USB, etc.)

_ Wireless devices attached to a network port or network device

11.1.c Verify that the documented process to identify unauthorized wireless access points is performed at least quarterly for all system components and facilities.

11.1.d If automated monitoring is utilized (e.g., wireless IDS/IPS, NAC), verify the configuration will generate alerts to personnel.

11.1.e Verify the organizationʼs incident response plan (Requirement 12.9) includes a response in the event unauthorized wireless devices are detected.

PCI wants you to detect rogue access points. However there is a flaw here. PCI doesn’t require you to monitor your network for rogue access points. It just want you detect them quarterly…

Well, what if attacker deploy an AP after you run your quarterly scan? You will be vulnerable lots of networking attack for a 3 more months and you will think you’re secure since you have PCI certification… This is another example of why you should not think you are secure just because you have a certification…

Anyway, let’s return our subject. So we need to determine rogue AP quarterly. Himm. Let’s see. We can do this by scanning all wireless APs and comparing the BSSIDs (mac address) of the APs that have same SSID with our APs. If we see any AP that has our SSID but not in our asset, that AP is a rogue AP.

A. Windows

Go to Start, type powershell, on the blue screen of power shell run these two following commands:

Netsh wlan show networks mode=bssid -> To get all BSSIDs

Netsh wlan show networks mode=ssid-> To get all SSIDs

B. MAC

KisMAC is a free, open source wireless stumbling and security tool for Mac OS

You can download it at http://kismac-ng.org/

After you run the KisMAC, click Start Scan in the bottom right corner.

C. Linux

Kismet is an 802.11 wireless network detector, sniffer, and intrusion detection system. Kismet will work with any wireless card which supports raw monitoring

mode, and can sniff 802.11b, 802.11a, 802.11g, and 802.11n traffic (devices and drivers permitting).

Linux users can download Kismet at http://www.kismetwireless.net

Note: Please read the full manual, but for the quick starters, here is the bare minimal instruction to operate Kismet:

• Download Kismet from http://www.kismetwireless.net/download.shtml

• Run “./configure”. Pay attention to the output! If Kismet cannot find all the  headers and libraries it needs, major functionality may be missing. Most notably, compiling Kismet yourself will require the development packages and headers, usually called foo-dev or foo-devel.

• Make sure that all the functionality you need was enabled properly in configure. Almost all users will need pcap and libnl support for proper operation.

• Compile Kismet with “make”.

• Install Kismet with either “make install” or “make suidinstall”.

Note: you must read the “suid” installation and security” section of the Readme or your system may be insecure.

• If you have installed Kismet as suid-root, add your user to the “kismet” group

• Run “kismet”. If you did not install Kismet with suid-root support, you need to start it as root in nearly all situations. This is not recommended as it is

less secure than privsep mode, where packet processing is segregated  from admin rights.

• When prompted to start the Kismet server, choose “Yes”.

• When prompted to add a capture interface, add your wireless interface. In nearly all cases, Kismet will autodetect the device type and supported

channels. If it does not, you will have to manually define the capture type   (as explained later in this README).

• Logs will be stored in the directory created when you started using Kismet, unless it changed via the “logprefix” config file or “–log-prefix” startup option.

• READ THE REST OF THIS README. Kismet has a lot of features and a lot of configuration options. To get the most out of it, you must read all of

the documentation.

 

With these tools you can get all SSIDs and BSSIDs on your area (It is good idea to capture packets in different areas of your buildings so that you have better chance to detect any existed rogue APs.

 

Update: I have received couple of e-mail about PCI scope on wireless. Here is what PCI says about it:

“Wireless
If wireless technology is used to store, process, or transmit cardholder data (for example, point-of-sale transactions, “line-busting”), or if a wireless
local area network (WLAN) is connected to, or part of, the cardholder data environment (for example, not clearly separated by a firewall), the PCI
DSS requirements and testing procedures for wireless environments apply and must be performed (for example, Requirements 1.2.3, 2.1.1, and
4.1.1). Before wireless technology is implemented, an entity should carefully evaluate the need for the technology against the risk. Consider
deploying wireless technology only for non-sensitive data transmission.”

I believe it is pretty straight forward.  If there is no separation of wired/wireless networks with a firewall on your cardholder data environment you cannot think wireless network is out of your scope…

Reset Your Windows Password

We have lots of password to remember : workstation, servers, banks, forums, mails etc… This makes forgetting passwords easier. Today I would like to mention how to remove reset admin password on windows.

I am going to use chntpw. chntpw is a Linux utility to (re)set the password of any user that has a valid (local) account on your WinNT or Win2000 system, by modifying the crypted password in the registry’s SAM file. You do not need to know the old password to set a new one. It works offline (i.e., you have to shutdown your computer and boot off a linux floppy disk).

1. Insert Backtrack’s DVD on your windows computer and boot from CD (usually you can hit f2, f12 in order to see boot order, then you can force computer to boot from CD/DVD).

2. Mount your windows partition:

2.1. Run fdisk -l to determine where is your windows partition.
My windows partition is /dev/sda1

2.2 Create empty folder to mount windows partition.
mkdir /mnt/windows

2.3mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/windows

3. Go into chntpw directory
cd /pentest/passwords/chntpw

4. Run chntpw against your SAM

./chntpw -i /mnt/windows//WINDOWS/system32/config/SAM
5. Type the username you want to reset password, enter, then press 1, enter.

6. After made the changes,  you need to exit from the main chntpw menu and press “Y” to write the changes or “N”to ignore the changes.

 

Detecting Rogue Virtual Machines On A Network

Introduction

Today our topic is detecting rogue virtual machines. Rogue virtual machines can pose huge threat to your organization. Even with your managed machines, you might have unauthorized virtual machines. There are some ways to keep the number of rogue vm’s very low on your network such as using software policy, restricting admin accounts for those only need them etc..

What if your employees install virtual machines without your knowledge. How can you detect those virtual machines?

Detecting “evil” at rest

If you can identify all virtual machines that sits on your network, then you can compare them with the authorized virtual machines. In this way you can find rogue virtual machines.

There are two ways you can identify virtual machines. One way is checking MAC address, other is checking running process.

First way: Checking MAC address of remote system

MAC addresses are unique to each device. If you can get a mac address of a device then you can tell what company is made the device. Since virtual machines uses their virtual network adapter to connect a network and this virtual adapters are unique to each company, we can determine if mac address belong to a virtual machine company.

So how can we get mac addresses of other computers on a network?

The answer is easy. We can ping each devices on the network and then check our arp tables.

OR we can use nmap.

nmap -sP 192.168.1.1/24
Starting Nmap 5.35DC1 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2011-03-17 22:35 EDT
Nmap scan report for 192.168.1.1
Host is up (0.018s latency).
MAC Address: 00:24:A1:17:44:CD (Motorola CHS)
Nmap scan report for 192.168.1.13
Host is up (0.000094s latency).
MAC Address: 00:26:BB:07:17:DD (Apple)
Nmap scan report for 192.168.1.11
Host is up (0.014s latency).
MAC Address: 00:1B:77:CD:FF:CD (Intel Corporate)
Nmap scan report for 192.168.1.13
Host is up.
Nmap done: 256 IP addresses (4 hosts up) scanned in 5.53 seconds

As you see nmap has predefined mac database so it can convert mac addresses to manufacturer’s name.

Second way: Checking Process Names

You can get mac address of the computers that sits on the same vlan/lan with you so first option is only good for you have only one lan. Moreover some virtual adapters can be on NAT mode so you cannot see their MAC address.  (On NAT mode they use same mac address with the physical machine.)

Each virtual machine software will have running processes. For example VM Fusion has vmware-vmx as running process on OSX. So you can login each machine to see if there is a running process related with a virtual machine software.

Nessus has a plugin for checking vm ware machines  by using this technique(http://blog.tenablesecurity.com/2007/04/i_was_speaking_.html) , you can write your own plugin to find other virtual instances.

The disadvantage of this method is you need to have admin credentials.

Summary

We can find rogue virtual machines on network by comparing all virtual machines with authorized virtual machines. We can identify all vms by using mac addresses or running processes. With the first method we can only identify virtual instances on the same LAN. With the second method we need to have admin credentials for the boxes we scan.

Update: Please check here for more info http://realinfosec.com/?p=678

 

 

 

CEH Module 5: Scanning (NMAP)

Today I would like to write about CEH module 5, that is Scanning. The last module was covered on this blog was Footprinting can be found here If you want to see all the modules written about CEH, you can click “Certified Ethical Hacker” section at the right side bar.

Even tough I will talk about some general scanning techniques, my focus will be on practical knowledge of nmap that is heavily is tested on your CEH exam. I will not go deep on the nmap, you can do lots of cool stuff with it, but my focus will be its general usage for the ceh exam.

NMAP

Nmap (Network Mapper) is a security scanner originally written by Gordon Lyon used to discover hosts and services on a computer network, thus creating a “map” of the network. To accomplish its goal, Nmap sends specially crafted packets to the target host and then analyzes the responses.

You need to know some basic options, scan types, IP addresses’ and ports’ formats in nmap.

OPTIONS

-sT: connect scan -sX:XMAS scan
-sS: syn scan (half open) -sP: ping scan
-sF: fyn scan -sU:UDP scan
-sO: raw scan -O: OS detection

3 way hand shake will be performed on the connect scan, that is why this option is slow and will have lots of footprints on the target system.
Syn scan will only send SYN packets to targets. If the port is open then we will receive SYN+ACK other wise we will receive RST that indicates the port is closed…
Ping scan: This also known as ping sweep. Basically nmap will be pinging all the given machines and determine live hosts.
UDP scan: In case you want to see UDP ports, you need to run a UDP scan.

IP addresses

192.168.0.1-255
scanme.nmap.org/24
192.168.0.1/26

Port

-p23,25,80
-p1-1000

Examples

nmap -sS scanme.nmap.org/24 -p1-65535
nmap -sT -O 192.168.0.1-25 -p23

Hiding Data: Steganography on Linux

My last blog post was about hiding info on slackspace by using a special tool called Bmap. Today I am going to discuss Steganography in more general. Steganography is the art and science of writing hidden messages in such a way that no one, apart from the sender and intended recipient, suspects the existence of the message. It is different than encryption since encryption may not care existence of cipher text from outside world. However steganography deals with hiding information even if it is encrypted.

See following example:

Alex wants to send a message to Bob. She wants only Bob reads the message. She can use encryption (symmetric or asymmetric). The risk here is possible attack for deciphering her message. She can also try hiding the message in a different format (say in a jpeg file) and send over the Bob. Since the message will be in a picture probably attacker Tom will not recover the message from the file.

Of course in case he desperately wants to read the message, he can use some forensics tools to read the message. For this reason combining encryption with a stenography will be best choice for Alex.

Today I am going to discuss a Linux tool steghide that does both encryption and stenography. On debian based system you can install steghide by following command:

apt-get install steghide

By default steghide compress the embedded data, and encrypted with rijndael-128 algorithm.

I have two files under my Private folder:

root@bt:~/Private# ls -l
total 24
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root    20 Jan 30 18:24 myMessageToBob.txt
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 17875 Jan 30 18:23 soccer.jpg

My goal is embedding text file into jpeg file.

Let’s check if we have enough space on jpeg file to do that:

steghide info soccer.jpg
"soccer.jpg":
format: jpeg
capacity: 1.0 KB
Try to get information about embedded data ? (y/n)

So we can embed 1.0KB data and we only have 20B data (see ls -l output)

root@bt:~/Private# steghide embed -cf soccer.jpg -ef myMessageToBob.txt
Enter passphrase:
Re-Enter passphrase:
embedding "myMessageToBob.txt" in "soccer.jpg"... done

-cf stands for cover file whereas -ef stands for embedded file.

Let’s now check the size of the jpeg file.

ls -l
total 24
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root    20 Jan 30 18:24 myMessageToBob.txt
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 18396 Jan 30 18:27 soccer.jpg

Himm, it got bigger and that was expected but the original data was just 20B and we know that steghide will compress data before embedding.

As you guess the reason of 521B (18396-17875) is encryption and crc check sum of the embedded data that will also added into the jpeg file.

Try to open the jpeg file. You will not see any difference from the original jpeg file.

Now, we want to extract the data out of the jpeg file.

root@bt:~/Private# steghide extract -sf soccer.jpg
Enter passphrase:
the file "myMessageToBob.txt" does already exist. overwrite ? (y/n) y
wrote extracted data to "myMessageToBob.txt".


root@bt:~/Private# ls -l
total 24
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root    20 Jan 30 18:58 myMessageToBob.txt
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 18396 Jan 30 18:27 soccer.jpg

After we extracted the text file from jpeg file the file in the jpeg is still there (check the size after embedding and after extracting, they are same)

The only disadvantage I can think of is not being able to wipe the data from the cover file (the file you embed data into).

Hiding Data: Slack Space on Linux

I am going to cover slack space in various operating systems. the first post would be about the slack space in Linux.

What is Slack Space?

Before going to explain slack space, one should know what blocks (on Linux) and clusters mean (on Windows).  Blocks are specific sized containers used by file system to store data. Blocks can also be defined as the smallest pieces of data that a file system can use to store information. Files can consist of a single or multiple blocks/clusters in order to fulfill the size requirements of the file. When data is stored in these blocks two mutually exclusive conditions can occur; The block is completely full, or the block is partially full. If the block is completely full then the most optimal situation for the file system has occurred. If the block is only partially full then the area between the end of the file the end of the container is referred to as slack space. Linux write nulls on slack space. This means to find data in slack space on Linux systems are rare. However, it is not impossible.

Today, I am going to show how to hide data on slack spaces using a tool called bmap.

Bmap

Bmap ,a data hiding tool, can utilize slack space in blocks to hide data.

It can  perform lots of functions interesting to the computer forensics community and the computer security community. However, in this article we will focus on its data hiding capability.

Installing Bmap

Click this link and save the tar.gz file on your Linux desktop.tar xvzf bmap-1.0.17.tar.gz

After untaring the file, we now can go inside of the directory and compile the program.
cd bmap-1.0.17
make

Optional: I placed bmap into /sbin so don’t need to go into the bmap directory each time I want to run the program.
ln -s yourBmapFilePath /sbin/bmap

Hiding Data on Slack Space

In the following example we will hide some text into slack space. Let’s see what options we have with bmap:
bmap --help
bmap:1.0.17 (12/25/10) newt@scyld.com
Usage: bmap [OPTION]... []
use block-list knowledge to perform special operations on files
--doc VALUE
where VALUE is one of:
version display version and exit
help display options and exit
man generate man page and exit
sgml generate SGML invocation info
--mode VALUE
where VALUE is one of:
map list sector numbers
carve extract a copy from the raw device
slack display data in slack space
putslack place data into slack
wipeslack wipe slack
checkslack test for slack (returns 0 if file has slack)
slackbytes print number of slack bytes available
wipe wipe the file from the raw device
frag display fragmentation information for the file
checkfrag test for fragmentation (returns 0 if file is fragmented)
--outfile write output to ...
--label useless bogus option
--name useless bogus option
--verbose be verbose
--log-thresh logging threshold ...
--target operate on ...

The option I am going to use –mode option with slack, putslack, wipe, map VALUEs. I have created a text file named Ismail.txt. Let’s see what sectors this file uses.
bmap --mode map ismail.txt
3113400
3113401
3113402
3113403
3113404
3113405
3113406
3113407

As you can see from the output of bmap, ismail.txt uses 8 sectors starting from 3113400. This corresponds a block in Linux. This text file is too small to use all of these sector in the block.

bmap --mode slack ismail.txt
getting from block 389175
file size was: 8
slack size: 4088
block size: 4096

The file only uses 8 bytes (1 sector is 512 bytes, so it is in the first sector). All of 7 sectors and 504 bytes of the first sector are empty (Linux write null on the slack space, so all they have 0s.)

We can use this slack space to hide data.

echo "I'm hiding this and you cannot easily see it" | bmap --mode putslack ismail.txt
stuffing block 389175
file size was: 8
slack size: 4088
block size: 4096

Now check what we have in slack space:

bmap --mode slack ismail.txt
getting from block 389175
file size was: 8
slack size: 4088
block size: 4096
I'm hiding this and you cannot easily see it

(This command also gives the block number of the file, 389175)

We can now wipe the data we put on slack space.
bmap --mode wipe ismail.txt

bmap --mode slack ismail.txt
getting from block 389175
file size was: 8
slack size: 4088
block size: 4096

Summary

Slack space can be used for hiding data. Even though advanced forensics tools reveal the hidden information in slack space, most system owners will not check all slack space since this is so time consuming activity. Bmap is one of the tool that helps attackers to hide information into slack space on Linux systems. As security engineers, we need to be careful when we analyze a compromised Linux systems and check slack space as well.

Google search results warn of compromised sites

Google has been warning Web surfers about sites that appear to be hosting malware in search results for years. Now, the company is adding a warning in search results when the site appears to be compromised but may not be actually downloading malware to visitors’ computers.

Starting today, Google search users should start seeing a new hyperlink warning that says “This site may be compromised,” adjacent to some results if Google’s system has detected something on the site that would indicate that it has been hacked or otherwise compromised. Clicking on the warning link leads to a Help Center article with more information.

“If a site has been hacked, it typically means that a third party has taken control of the site without the owner’s permission,” the article says. “Hackers may change the content of a page, add new links on a page, or add new pages to the site. The intent can include phishing (tricking users into sharing personal and credit card information) or spamming (violating search engine quality guidelines to rank pages more highly than they should rank).” Web surfers can also just click on the result to go directly to the site.

Google first started putting warnings next to results in late 2006, but focused on sites that were hosting or actively serving malware. Those warnings say “This site may harm your computer,” and clicking on the result itself takes you to another page that provides more information.

The new warning is designed to focus on Web sites that may not be actively infecting computers, but that may be compromised and conducting other types of attacks, such as spam or phishing.

Along with warning Web searchers, Google tries to notify Web masters when they detect that their site may be compromised via messages in the Google Webmaster tools console, Google said.

“Of course, we also understand that Webmasters may be concerned that these notices are impacting their traffic from search,” Google says in a post on the Webmaster Central blog today. “Rest assured, once the problem has been fixed, the warning label will be automatically removed from our search results, usually in a matter of days. You can also request a review of your site to accelerate removal of the notice.”

Originally posted at InSecurity Complex